Archive by Author | frugalparagon

June: In Which I Make Short Work of My Third Paycheck

Since I’m paid every two weeks, June was a three-paycheck month for me. Which works out nicely, because it was also the month my car insurance payment was due. Since I knew they would coincide, I didn’t worry about saving up to pay my whole car insurance. They will align again in December and I will reevaluate then. Anyway, here’s how it broke down for June.

Income

Library take-home pay: $2546.12

Money that I am not sure why Amazon sent me: $11.05

Cash: $20

Interest: $6.74

Trivia income: $70

Travel money: $50

Reconciliation adjustment: $5.95 (my record keeping, it is imperfect)

Support: $555

Total income: $3265.08

Expenses

Rent and included utilities: $1085.45

Replacement bowl for Cuisinart, secondhand: $21

ATM fees: $2.50 (reimbursable)

Laundry: $40

Renter’s insurance installment: $33.50

Electric: $17.43 (My AC doesn’t work very well anyway, so I just… sweat)

Ting: $26.75

Internet: $9.95

Groceries: $277.16

Wine: $6.47

Gas: $47.82

Car insurance: $451 (6 months of full coverage on my Fit)

Kids allowance and miscellaneous: $50.14

Asthma medicine: $184.01 (Every time a pharmacy clerk rings this up for me, they visibly recoil when they see the price. Fortunately, it lasts three or four months.)

Babysitter: $45

Restaurants: $16.30

Amazon music: $4.30

Coffee shops: $19.35

Gifts and miscellaneous shopping, including some workout equipment: $91.38

Travel: $150.16 (the rest of my Vegas trip from last month)

Charitable donation: $3.20

Total expenses: $2577.87

Analysis

Well, I still had a good bit of that third paycheck left over. Under $2600 for the month in which I paid my car insurance seems pretty fabulous, spending-wise.

July is already shaping up to be much spendier–I have been buying more entertainment than usual–but I’m happy with how June turned out! Aside from continuing to improve my wardrobe, I’m saving up for when I can hopefully move and will need some new furniture. (Being as I currently have a combined couch/bed situation, and the goal of moving would be to have my own room, logically I would need to purchase either a bed or a couch.)

In exciting budget and parenting news, Little Brother, who turned 5 in May, no longer sleeps in Pull-Ups! That will help my grocery bill. I have eleventy billion left over, which I have donated to the XFP and his wife for the younger stepbrothers. Having my kids finally totally potty trained makes me very sympathetic to those whose children are not.

Better Late Than Never: May Spending

So… it’s June 21. And I never totaled up my May spending. I almost didn’t at all, but I’m glad I took the time–while everything gets added up by YNAB, I learn a lot about myself and my habits from typing it all out. So here’s May.

Library take-home pay: $1795.50

Returning things to Costco: $82.97

Subbing take-home pay: $44.05

Interest income: $6.48

Trivia income: $35

Ebates: $1.95

Support: $575

Total income: $2540.95

ATM fees (reimbursable): $.50

Rent and included utilities: $1079.02

Home supplies: $83.32 (mostly a vacuum cleaner, plus odds and ends)

Laundry: $40

Electricity: $16.18

Ting: $31.56

Internet: $9.95

Groceries: $212.24 (I was out of town for a few days and also had a gift card)

Wine: $6.47

Gas: $50.35

Parking ticket: $50 (Forgot to read the damn street sweeping sign. This happens to me at least once a summer. I think of it as a sort of urban road maintenance tax.)

Parking: $6 (reimbursable)

Children’s allowance and ice cream: $14.62

Restaurants: $30.49

Amazon music: $4.30

Coffee shops, burrito runs at work, etc.: $18.52

Clothes for me: $78.47

Fabric and sewing notions: $83.73. Because patterns were on sale and I may have gotten carried away at Joann.

Gifts: $73.81 (There was a birthday)

Miscellaneous shopping and spending, including a haircut and some ebooks: $108.50

Travel: $325.87 (for Vegas trip; there was another hundred-ish in June)

Donations: $5

Cat food: $24.75

Total Expenses: $2352.65

Surplus: $188.30

Analysis

Well, if you’ve ever read one of my spending reports before, you know it always starts out, “I need a full-time job.” But somehow I keep managing. I enjoy some luxuries, even, thanks to careful money management and the generosity of family and good friends. (I got my eyebrows professionally waxed, for instance. That Vegas trip? Heavily subsidized. Thanks, Mom! And I received some lovely gift cards as a Mother’s Day present, which I spent on things like non-pre-owned sheets for my bed, new cutting boards, and Frappucinos.)

Goal: Secure more hours before October so I can comfortably afford a second bedroom.

How was your May?

Jeans, More Jeans, and a Beach Cover-Up: More Sewing Projects

After I finally, at very long last, finished my skirt project, I was kind of on a roll and tackled a few other jobs.

First I patched a pair of jeans. See, sometimes you want old jeans, right? But my jeans wear out at the inside thigh, which makes them go instantly from “presentable” to “might expose flesh” overnight. So if I want to have serviceable old jeans, I have to patch this area.

I have iron-on patches, but they’re kind of stiff. Instead, I like to cut up an even older pair of jeans and use that. Big Brother had these wide-legged 4T jeans that passed the point of repairability, so I used those. I cut a piece using pinking shears and sewed it down, using a zigzag stitch over the most vulnerable area. Before I owned pinking shears, I used a zigzag stitch to attach the patches, which is serviceable but makes a more noticeable repair (as the stitches can more easily be seen from the outside than a straight stitch.) You can really only see it from the outside at all because I accidentally caught a tiny bit of fabric as I was sewing.

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Over time, the double hem creates a line on the outside of the jeans. Blech.

Next, I had a pair to hem. Now, I know cuffing jeans is in fashion this year, but I’m so short that I would have way too bulky a cuff unless I hem (being as I could not find Short in my size). I consider the ideal leg width for skinny jeans to be “exactly as wide as my sewing machine in free-arm mode.”

I tried a new method. In the past, I have simply cut some off and double-hemmed using dark blue thread, but this is a pain and I don’t like the way it look as it wears.

So instead I used this tutorial for preserving the original hem. I hear that the flap of fabric created on the inside can be annoying, so I chose to stitch it down across the front and not just at the sides. These stitches are technically visible from the outside, but you can’t really see them.

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Inside view. I did the zigzag BEFORE cutting off the excess. My machine does not like to sew too close to the edge of the fabric.

I like the way it looks… but I accidentally left them too long, so I still have to cuff them. Oops!

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Real quick, I mended the side of an old bath towel. It is otherwise perfectly serviceable, and you can’t have too many bath towels. I cut off the frayed strings. Part of the edge was still in place, so I zigzagged stitched it back down. This being an old bath towel, I didn’t worry about buying special matching thread!

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For my piece de resistance, I had an impulse to turn an old jersey sheet into a bathing suit cover-up. This is more a cutting project than a sewing one. I used this tutorial, which claims to be twenty-minute project. It took me a couple of hours. I kept having to cut and cut and cut more. Then of course I probably cut too much. The only sewing was attaching the braided straps. I was afraid that they would not fit under my presser foot, but it worked just fine. I made a little box to hold each strap in place.

After I sewed these on, I cut down the surrounding fabric.

I think it kind of looks like I made it from a sheet. But it will serve for getting the kids to and from the pool at our apartment complex, at least!

Now I have put away my sewing machine for a while with firm intentions to work on my scrapbook, although I did promise Big Brother a new apron soon.

What are you making lately? How’s it coming out?

Well, That Got Out of Hand: I Made a Skirt Without a Pattern

This post contains affiliate links for research purposes. I got my books from the library.

If you’ve been following along, you know that first I made skirts from library book patterns (here’s the first and the second). Then I tried making a gathered rectangular skirt, which does not require a pattern. The waistband came out pretty well, but the result was unflattering.

Then I took it into my head to learn pattern drafting.

Friends, I am not sure what I was thinking. Man, that was hard.

First, I made a straight skirt sloper just from taking my measurements and drawing things on freezer paper. I was very pleased with myself. Then I slashed and spread the pattern and raised the waistband to make a high-waist flared skirt sloper. So far, so good. Although it took me a couple of tries to get the fit right, so by this point I had been fiddling with the project for some weeks.

The flared, high-waisted sloper. Down to 1 dart per side because the other is where I slashed and spread. You must forgive me for not modelling i.

Now I was ready to move on to the actual sewing. The book I was using, Skirt-a-Day Sewing*, gives very specific directions for making specific designs rather than expecting the reader to do so. To make the pattern for the design I chose, there was yet more slashing and spreading involved to turn the darts into pleats.

*I think it’s important to note that this refers to having a different skirt for every day of the month, NOT the length of time they take to make!

A major weakness of the book is that it does not give instructions with this pattern for truing the waistline or the hem after all that slashing and spreading. Not sure it came out right.

Instead of a zipper, this skirt uses button-down tabs. When you unbutton, you can open the tabs and step in and out. There’s also a hidden snap holding the tab in place. It only took me 8 tries to make a passable four-step buttonhole.

The big knot is where the bobbin thread ran out. It goes faster than I expect.

I was worried about lining up the button and buttonhole and the two parts of the snap, but this seemed at least moderately forgiving. I did not have trouble. And I got to use the sew-in snaps that my grandmother gave me circa ten years ago (when my mom gave me a sewing machine for Christmas and grandma gave me a stocked sewing basket) and have not yet had a use for. Rather satisfying.

As always, there were some hiccups. For one thing, my machine is getting wonky. Sometimes it makes a giant knot instead of sewing. Oiling it approximately every 28 minutes helps, but is tedious. When it happens in an important place, like the right side of the hem (I am lazy and always hem with  straight stitch), I pick it out and start over. When it happens in an inconspicuous place, I pretend I don’t notice.

Reverse side of the front tab where the machine went wonky. Why is it white on the back? I ran out of fabric. Oops.

Another hiccup was my decision to add pockets. All skirts and dresses should have pockets, no? I traced a pocket shape from another book, Love at First Stitch: Demystifying Dressmaking. But those pockets were designed for  a rectangular skirt, and this has curved side seams. They hung weird at first. But a little ironing seemed to put them right.

Honestly, I’m still not sure about the skirt. I’m in love with the basic premise of a full skirt made of polka dots. Very 50s-ish and the silhouette is flattering. But possibly I will find the pleats waaaay too fiddly and always be adjusting them. The ones in the back I actually sewed down because I found that I did not need to open them to get the skirt on, but I think I made them too tight. I might need to move the front buttons and re-press the pleats closer to the middle.

Sorry for bad photo. The children were not feeling cooperative this morning.

My next two sewing projects are no-pattern easy things: Hemming jeans and making an awesome new boy apron for Big Brother. But I bow to conventional wisdom. The next time I make something for myself, I will take the easy road and buy a clearance pattern, even though I will lose the bragging rights. (“Thanks! I made it! From a library book!”) I think I need more time to develop my skills without the pressure of pattern drafting.

What are you making lately? How’s it coming out?

April 2017 Spending: Ouch

Well, I had some nasty surprises in April. Here’s how it breaks down.

Income

Library take-home pay: $1462.92 (Why so low? I upped my HSA contributions, and the boys’ spring break hurt my earnings)

Costco return: $10.76

Substitute teaching take-home pay: $44.06

Interest: $5.95

Support: $743

Total Income: $2266.69

Expenses

Rent plus included utilities: $1085.31

Home supplies: $10

Laundry: $40

Speeding ticket: $305 (So frustrated with self! I was driving an unfamiliar road and didn’t see the school zone sign)

XCel: $19.31

Ting: $24.54

Comcast: $9.95

Groceries: $305.91

Wine: $12.94

Auto maintenance: $153.31 (When I went to have my summer tires put back on, one of them turned out to be broken and had to be replaced. It was new enough they said I could just do the one.)

Gas: $44.91

Parking (reimbursable): $11

Kids, misc. (allowance, field trips, ice cream): $27.62

Kids, clothes and shoes: $82.10 (2 pairs new sneakers, 1 pair Batman PJs with cape)

Restaurants: $101.70 (Yowza! My boyfriend had a birthday and a cousin visited from out of town in the same month.)

Coffee shops and snacks: $22.88 (I promise there were a lot of times I wanted it and didn’t get it.)

Tickets to special Viking exhibit at museum: $20.85

Work clothes and shoes for me: $271.40 (Because if I want to be taken seriously, probably should not wear hiking shoes to work, right?)

Some things from Target: $20.12

Cat litter: $14

Total Expenses: $2577.83

Income minus expenses: -$311.14

Analysis

Eh, I can live with it. By now, I’ve gotten used to my low-income, low-expenses balancing act tipping sometimes into the black and sometimes the red. It’s more often black, so I’ll live. I had enough money to cover the shortage without dipping into my emergency fund. And I still have money set aside for various projects (like an upcoming trip and taking the cat to the vet).

Possibly, however, I sobbed when I got the speeding ticket. There is a definite mismatch between how long it takes me to save $305 and how long it took me to lose it! At least I had the money. I blew my nose, mailed a check, and lived to fight another day.

March Spending: Modest Progress

Income

Library take-home pay: $1771.47

Interest: $3.02

Trivia income: $35

Support: $786

Refund from Children’s Hospital: $466.72

Colorado tax refund: $481

Shopping return: $74.27

Total income: $3617.48

Spending

ATM fees: $2.50 (reimbursable)

Rent: $1072.79

Household items: $20.81

Laundry: $40

Renter’s insurance (quarterly): $33.50

XCel (electric): $18.47

Ting: $24.52

Comcast: $9.95

Groceries: $320.03

Wine: $6.47

Oil change plus car wash: $82.44 (Evidently my car runs on synthetic oil and this is very expensive)

Gas: $46.12

Parking: $3

Miscellaneous kids (allowances plus a field trip): $40

Occasional after-school care: $68

Adult health spending: $189.44 (asthma medicine–OUCH)

Restaurants: $28.46

Coffee and donuts: $42.36

Adult clothes and sewing notions for making adult clothes: $124.20

Haircut, hiking poles, something from Target, and other miscellany: $147.59

Child care punch card at the gym: $15

Cat supplies: $27.45

Total spending: $2363.10

Analysis

This was another windfall month, and I both bolstered some savings/spending categories (setting aside money to refresh work wardrobe, for instance) and set aside some money for investing. I would like to point out that my spending, though not particularly restrained, was under my “regular” income.

Groceries continue to get away from me. I drank only one bottle of wine all month but apparently spent an unreasonable amount of money on coffee and donuts.

My paychecks have dipped a little because I have more money going into my HSA, which I am trying to grow as an investment vehicle but which doubles as an emergency fund.

So, not an exciting month, but everything on track. I still need a better-paying job. While I see places I can trim a little, let’s be honest: My spending is killer low. The income side is where the improvement is needed. Especially as I would like to be less dependent on support from the XFP.

How was your March?

I’m Learning Patternmaking: My First Sloper

I’m much too cheap to buy patterns, even on clearance. I have made a couple of skirts using patterns from library books–they are printed on thick book-type paper, as opposed to the thinner sort of pattern paper, and one traces them. (Freezer paper is excellent for this purpose.) My first foray into making a skirt without a pattern ended badly–the muslin was wildly unflattering.

Nevertheless, I persisted. I wasn’t that happy with the skirts I had made from patterns. They are fully lined with no waistband, and the lining never even came close to lining up with the outside. They also don’t really have enough volume to accommodate pockets. (I used The Essential A-line: Make 17 Flirty Skirts from 1 Basic Pattern, and I still think it can be a good starting place. I wear the skirts regularly, I just think I can do better.)

For my next project, I chose the book Skirt-a-Day Sewing, which I had rejected before as being too difficult. I think I’m ready now. This one offers 28 different skirt designs and walks the reader through how to take measurements, draft a basic pattern, and then alter it for each specific design. So the final result is prescribed and the instructions are very specific… but there is no pattern to cut out or trace.


Another one that I looked at is How to Make Sewing Patterns. This was a little too much like drinking from a fire hose for my current needs. The many complicated measurements that it prescribes probably won’t improve my results until my skills catch up–at which point I might find it very helpful. And it offers only a little design guidance.

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My first pattern. I was trying to “true” the darts. I still don’t understand this part and am not sure it’s important.

Guys, I’m having a lot of fun! All the measuring and drawing has been an enjoyable challenge and has really improved my understanding of garment construction.

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Yes, this is me, in my spectacularly messy bathroom, trying on my fitting shell while also wearing a pajama top and taking a selfie. This is not the glamorous part of fashion design.

So far, I have gotten as far as making a basic sloper–basically a fitting shell. Next, the book suggests making a second sloper that is specific to the basic type of skirt (flared, in this case). Since flaring the skirt involves “slashing and spreading” the pattern I made from my measurements, I think that’s worth the four dollars of muslin. (Maybe gingham would have been better but I couldn’t bring myself to pay seven dollars for two yards’ worth.)

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“Slash and spread”–not as violent as it sounds.

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My makeshift hip curve. I found it did not match my actual curve well.

I could have gotten away without buying anything, and at first I did. Some people say you can draw the curved hip portion of a side seam using a dinner plate, but I tried that and it wasn’t even close to the right shape. Which makes sense, because hips are not actually circular. So for a while, I used a downloaded hip curve ruler, which I pasted to a Cheerios box for stiffening and cut out. That worked OK. But I decided to go ahead and buy a flexible curve ruler (about $10, bought with Amazon reward points).

Skirt-A-Day prescribed a hip curve, but I thought the flexible curve, recommended in Make Sewing Patterns, would be more versatile. I guess time will tell.

Onward with the second sloper!

What are you making lately? How are the results?

A Windfall Savings Strategy

If you’ve read, well, anything I’ve posted since last summer, you probably know that I live a little close to the bone by the middle-class standards I’m used to.

My regular monthly income is generally adequate to my regular monthly expenses and even most of my irregular expenses. It does not, however, leave much over for savings.

That’s where my windfall strategy comes in. I get two main kinds of windfalls: the Earned Income Tax Credit and three-paycheck months. The EITC is a doozy, and it came at a perfect time for me (February).

See, in January I was totally tapped out. I had taken money I didn’t really have yet, plus all the money I did have (Christmas money, December’s third paycheck, everything I could cadge from my HSA) and used it to pay off the divorce lawyer I had consulted. Nothing left, period, and with my monthly earnings so low, reaching a comfortable savings cushion felt very far away indeed. Then I found out the size of my tax refund.

Side note: I’m not sure “refund” is really an adequate word because it is money I did not pay. The EITC is really other people’s money, which makes it more like welfare. I am grateful to receive it, and look forward to paying my share in the future.

I did buy a few things, but my February income turned out to be totally adequate to cover my purchases, leaving my entire EITC available to create savings.

Step one was to budget for March. I have not been following the general financial principal that you should live off last month’s money. I have been living off the money I was earning in the present month, leaving me in the red until I received my support check and last paycheck. Not a pleasant feeling.

So first, I budgeted for March, generously–March’s rent, groceries, everything, and with some left over because I know I probably forgot some things. I was realistic but moderately ambitious; I said I would keep groceries under $300, for instance. I will see how much money I earn in March and that’s what I will budget to cover April.

That took a good chunk of it, but there was plenty left. So I earmarked about 1 months’ expenses as an emergency fund. This is my liquid emergency fund, the money I would use if my car broke down, for instance. More of a rainy-day fund, if you will.

There was still some left over. I earmarked $500 for travel, aspirationally. Some day, I’m going to Paris. Because February was a good month for me, I STILL had some left over, which I earmarked as “investment holding.” I used to have a Roth IRA. It all went into the house we bought in 2015.* I would like to open one again as soon as I have enough money ($3000) to buy into the Vanguard Total Stock Market Index.

*The house where my ex-husband lives with his new wife and stepchildren and my name on the mortgage. This is a sore point.

That will leave me with three potential sources of emergency money, in the order that I would most likely tap them:

  1. Cash (in my Ally savings account);
  2. HSA (for medical, sure, but since I pay for things like my $185 asthma medicine out of pocket normally, I could submit those receipts later if I was in a bind for some other reason);
  3. Roth IRA–you can withdraw the contributions at any time, so again, if I was in a bind I could do so, unless the market had tanked quite spectacularly.

With my savings pretty well covered, I felt comfortable increasing my HSA contribution for the year to $4000, which will put me well over the investment threshold (right now that money is not earning interest, but I’ll have some options once it tops $2100).

I feel good about where I am, savings-wise. It’s not exactly putting me on the fast track to retirement, but it’s adequate for my current standard of living. Which could use a little increase, to be frank, and feeling a little more secure in my savings makes me feel like I can afford, for instance, new mixing bowls, when the old ones start moving past “gross” and into “health code violation.”

How did your tax season shake out? If you got a refund, what did you do with it?

February 2017 Spending: In the Black

In January, I found out that I qualified for the Earned Income Tax Credit and would be getting a sizable tax refund. Now, most of that money is intended for saving, and I’ll write a separate blog post about that. But I did think, well, I’m getting a good amount of money back, I can loosen the purse strings just a touch. And I bought a few things I’d been wanting for a long time.

The great thing is, I have been getting so many hours at the library, I am in the black even without touching that windfall. The other great news, money-wise, is that our CICP (Colorado Indigent Care Program) came through. I am getting refunds for a lot of the money I paid for Big Brother’s November ER visit and won’t have to make any more payments. Instead of owing about $2200, our bill became $70.

We were back at the ER in February getting Little Brother’s forehead stitched up, but no big deal–again, we will owe just $70, if I’m not mistaken.

With no further ado, here’s how February looks

Income

Returning things to Costco: $69.75

Library take-home pay: $2187.22

Subbing take-home pay: $44.06

Interest: 61 cents

Trivia writing: $95

Gift and travel money from Grandma FP: $125

Child and spousal support: $767

Medical reimbursement: $156.38 (more on this below)

Non-windfall income: $3443.01

Expenses

Rent and included utilities: $1084.08

Household oddments: $9.54

Laundry: $40

Stop-payment check fee: $35 (my rental office lost my check and will take this off of next month)

YNAB renewal: $45

Electric: $13.63

Ting: $25.52

Comcast: $9.95

Groceries: $456.40 (Holy smokes! What happened here?!)

Car wash: $10

Gas: $42.66

Parking: $21

Kid allowance: $18

Walkie-talkie batteries: $4

Boy clothes: $91.38

Children’s museum membership: $117.25

After-school babysitting: $88

Kid health: $160.86 (about $125 of this has since been reimbursed)

Adult health: $38.87 (meds and a dentist copay)

Coffee shops and snacks: $30.98

Restaurants: $28.63

Shoes and underwear: $293.81 (When I got my tax refund, I figured I could replace all 3 worn-out pairs of exercise shoes and stop wearing hand-me-down underwear.)

Year subscription to Washington Post online: $99 (I’ve been stealing their articles for like 10 years. Journalism costs money.)

Something from Target: $14.04

A non-leaking, non-disgusting travel mug: $2 (plus reward points)

Southwest credit card fee for a bunch of bonus miles: $99

Total spending: $2907.70

Analysis

I can’t count on always getting so many hours–I still need a full-time job. And over the summer, I will probably either have child care costs or way less income, so I need to be prepared for a few lean months.

But I feel great about February. I earned enough money. I spent some money on things that are important to me. I came out ahead, and I used a windfall to bolster my savings.

Mending Roundup: Yeses and Nos

This post contains affiliate links for your researching convenience. As always, my opinions are my own.

I’ve made a couple of repairs to our wardrobes lately… and “noped” out of some others. For all, I have made do with supplies on hand. Here’s how it looks.

1 school uniform shirt (not pictured)

Don’t get me started on the uniforms. Shirts are $10 apiece(!) for a school that is ninety-percent-plus free and reduced lunch (yes, my kids, too)  stain easily, and often wear out in a single school year. And this year the sizes changed and Little Brother will wear only last year’s grubby shirts because the new ones are too big.

Anyway, within the first two weeks of school, the seam under Big Brother’s armpit gave way in one of the new shirts. Stitched it up with needle and thread, by hand.

1 Goodwill sweater

I like this sweater, which is Loft brand and was $5 in excellent condition (thanks, Grandma FP). The underarm seam started to give way. I didn’t have any yarn-type thread, so I just used a double strand of regular thread. I didn’t have yellow so I just used white and tried to keep all the stitches on the inside. So far, the results are satisfactory, although the repair is visible from the outside if you look really closely. (Fortunately, people rarely shove their heads under my arms.) When I buy sweaters new, I generally do a pretty good job of keeping track of the repair thread, but this was from Goodwill, so no such luck.

1 Brassiere

I do not own a lot of bras so I was dismayed when I went to put this one on and felt a pop in the back. The little slider that adjusts the straps had broken.

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Broken slider.

Fortunately, I already had a set of lingerie repair doodads (Dritz Lingerie Strap Slides & Rings, if you want to get fancy–I probably bought them at Joann or Walmart) from a dress I had repaired and even had the right color.

Unfortunately, I got confused and snipped off the strap that was NOT broken. So  I had to re-sew both sides. I sewed by hand while watching TV using a thimble that came in one of those hotel sewing kits–you have to push hard to get through multiple strap layers.

Nope, not worth it: Old Navy pants

Both boys had these Old Navy cargo pants for school. They were on sale and I thought they were cute. Unfortunately, the fabric is thin and wears through quickly. Also, the narrow legs and knee gussets make repair challenging. While I have a package of iron-on patches, they tend to peel and I like to machine-sew them in place. Machine sewing also helps the patch adhere to the ripped area.

I tried to keep these going, I really did. But patch after patch after patch… No. It looks dreadful and is a ton of work. You can see below how the patches are a mess inside, layered on top of each other, and visible from the outside, and then new holes are showing. I was going to the half-price day of a semiannual consignment sale event and just got LB some replacement pants for a couple bucks each.

I am hoping that Costco will get in a new shipment of their French Toast uniform pants in the fall. These are nice thick fabric. I had bought maybe 7 pairs altogether for Big Brother at $10 each. Only one pair has ripped, and Costco gave my money back. LB was too small for them this year as the smallest size they had was 5, but by fall, he should be able to wear them. At least in a “to grow into” kind of way.

What are you mending lately?