Mending Roundup: Yeses and Nos

This post contains affiliate links for your researching convenience. As always, my opinions are my own.

I’ve made a couple of repairs to our wardrobes lately… and “noped” out of some others. For all, I have made do with supplies on hand. Here’s how it looks.

1 school uniform shirt (not pictured)

Don’t get me started on the uniforms. Shirts are $10 apiece(!) for a school that is ninety-percent-plus free and reduced lunch (yes, my kids, too)  stain easily, and often wear out in a single school year. And this year the sizes changed and Little Brother will wear only last year’s grubby shirts because the new ones are too big.

Anyway, within the first two weeks of school, the seam under Big Brother’s armpit gave way in one of the new shirts. Stitched it up with needle and thread, by hand.

1 Goodwill sweater

I like this sweater, which is Loft brand and was $5 in excellent condition (thanks, Grandma FP). The underarm seam started to give way. I didn’t have any yarn-type thread, so I just used a double strand of regular thread. I didn’t have yellow so I just used white and tried to keep all the stitches on the inside. So far, the results are satisfactory, although the repair is visible from the outside if you look really closely. (Fortunately, people rarely shove their heads under my arms.) When I buy sweaters new, I generally do a pretty good job of keeping track of the repair thread, but this was from Goodwill, so no such luck.

1 Brassiere

I do not own a lot of bras so I was dismayed when I went to put this one on and felt a pop in the back. The little slider that adjusts the straps had broken.

20170119_142242

Broken slider.

Fortunately, I already had a set of lingerie repair doodads (Dritz Lingerie Strap Slides & Rings, if you want to get fancy–I probably bought them at Joann or Walmart) from a dress I had repaired and even had the right color.

Unfortunately, I got confused and snipped off the strap that was NOT broken. So  I had to re-sew both sides. I sewed by hand while watching TV using a thimble that came in one of those hotel sewing kits–you have to push hard to get through multiple strap layers.

Nope, not worth it: Old Navy pants

Both boys had these Old Navy cargo pants for school. They were on sale and I thought they were cute. Unfortunately, the fabric is thin and wears through quickly. Also, the narrow legs and knee gussets make repair challenging. While I have a package of iron-on patches, they tend to peel and I like to machine-sew them in place. Machine sewing also helps the patch adhere to the ripped area.

I tried to keep these going, I really did. But patch after patch after patch… No. It looks dreadful and is a ton of work. You can see below how the patches are a mess inside, layered on top of each other, and visible from the outside, and then new holes are showing. I was going to the half-price day of a semiannual consignment sale event and just got LB some replacement pants for a couple bucks each.

I am hoping that Costco will get in a new shipment of their French Toast uniform pants in the fall. These are nice thick fabric. I had bought maybe 7 pairs altogether for Big Brother at $10 each. Only one pair has ripped, and Costco gave my money back. LB was too small for them this year as the smallest size they had was 5, but by fall, he should be able to wear them. At least in a “to grow into” kind of way.

What are you mending lately?

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About frugalparagon

I'm a part-time librarian and mom to two small boys. I blog about striving for the long-term goal of financial independence while running a tight ship at home.

3 responses to “Mending Roundup: Yeses and Nos”

  1. Mom FP says :

    One of my favorite repairs was when Dad FP had to re thread one of those bra straps. The repair was simple- how to get that thing going in the right direction was not. It was kind of funny to see a master mechanic using needle nose pliers and his expertise to get it started for me!

  2. Heather says :

    Great job on your sweater! I don’t think anyone will notice, and you are keeping it out of a landfill 🙂

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