Budgeting With Little Kids

This post contains affiliate links. I checked out the book referenced from my local library.

The only way to learn how to manage money is to have some money to manage. That’s why my boys, who are now four and five, get an allowance (two dollars per week).

(While I certainly do not embrace Dave Ramsey wholeheartedly, I got some good ideas about managing allowances with kids from his book Smart Money Smart Kids. In my house, the connection between chores and allowance is looser, but hopefully enough that the boys get the idea that money comes from work..)

As a general rule, they waste it. That’s how they learn, I suppose. It does bother me when their spending creates waste, as when they buy junky little toys that break, so I often try to create learning opportunities involve them purchasing their own consumables (markers, tape, construction paper, bubble liquid–things with which they tend to be profligate). The past couple of weeks, we have come across a couple of excellent non-wasteful learning opportunities for little tykes and their money.

Thrift Stores

Or as Little Brother calls them, “Smith stores.” I popped into a large one recommended by

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Not technically on list: stuffed turkey.

the XFP with quite a list of things I wanted for the kids and my new apartment, from “stock pot” and “ice bin” to “snow pants.” (All of which I found.)

 

It was allowance day and the boys went two different directions with their money. Little Brother bought one thing, a stuffed turkey from the Thanksgiving section. I think it’s meant to be a decoration, but he sleeps with it and kisses it and whatnot. He seems pretty satisfied with his purchase.

Big Brother bought a pre-assembled bag of Halloween nonsense, tiny decorations and party favors and whatnot. Well, at least it’s all pre-owned junk instead of new manufacturing. He managed to break one of the items before we even got home and hasn’t used or played with any of it. There’s a lesson for him here, although I suspect it won’t sink in for quite a while.

The Fall Festival

Their school had a PTO fundraiser. For a dollar, you could get four tickets and then use them to buy things like a turn in a bounce castle (two tickets) all the way up to a pumpkin you could paint (ten tickets).

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Captain American in the bounce house.

I bought each boy 12 tickets, using their two dollar allowance for that week plus one extra dollar. Big Brother immediately ruled out pumpkin painting as too expensive and went straight to the low-cost bounce houses. He spent his tickets on the two bounce houses plus a trip through the Haunted House (eight tickets). Now, here I was stumped. See, Little Brother had spent five tickets on a balloon flower and did not have enough money left for  the Haunted House, but Big Brother wouldn’t go through alone and I could hardly leave a four-year-old standing outside by himself. So I bought Little Brother some more tickets, figuring that Big Brother was of a better age to understand budgeting anyway. Actually “grace” is one thing Dave Ramsey talks about in the book; he advocates having your kids’ back sometimes (obviously not always, because then they would not learn that money is finite, but once in a while like this).

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Stem popped thirty seconds later.

They were, unsurprisingly, terrified by the Haunted House. As we walked to the car, Big Brother said that next year, he would rather paint a pumpkin. He was reflecting on his spending choices and thinking about to extract more happiness per dollar–I’d call that a win for a five-year-old any day!

How do you teach your kids about money?

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About frugalparagon

I'm a part-time librarian and mom to two small boys. I blog about striving for the long-term goal of financial independence while running a tight ship at home.

One response to “Budgeting With Little Kids”

  1. ChooseBetterLife says :

    Yes! They’re so lucky to have these choices, conversations, and experiences now when the stakes are small. You’re raising smart, thoughtful men.

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